Interview: The Cab’s Alex DeLeon—“To me, we were always a pop band”

May 12, 2014 by Jesse Richman

Interview: The Cab’s Alex DeLeon—“To me, we were always a pop band”

It's got that fat, bluesy sound to it.
Totally, yeah. And then "Stand Up," the guitar riff layered over the post-chorus "oohs” is an octave pedal, Jack White kind of sound. The bridge in "These Are The Lies" is insanely heavy, probably the heaviest thing we've ever done. So for me, when people are like, "Oh, the EP is really pop," it's like, yeah, it is very pop, but melodically we've always been really pop. We didn't really take away the heaviness, because to me the EP is more edgy, far more minor than our past releases. I mean, our past releases have so many major songs.

I'm a big Spotify fan; that was how I first listened to Lock Me Up. And on Spotify, there's an auto-generated list of "related artists,” which includes the Friday Night Boys, Anarbor, Every Avenue and Artist Vs. Poet. That era wasn't that long ago, but it feels like ancient history. Looking back, what sort of feelings does that time evoke for you? Is it a struggle to stay current when you could easily have slipped into history like some of those bands did?
All of those bands, just hearing their names brings a smile to my face, because those are some of my best friends. Those years were like the golden years. When music, to us, wasn't as much an industry as it was just being on the road in a van with your friends. Playing crappy venues, but playing for kids who sang along to every word, and you loved every second of it. You loved sleeping on the floor of hotel rooms. Those were almost like the rebellious teen years.

I'm extremely stubborn, and I don't take no for an answer. I think maybe I was just a little more stubborn than all of those guys, and decided to hold on a little longer. And I know some of those bands are still around, and a lot of those people have jumped into production and songwriting. But I've just always had the instinct to fight. I've never gotten the feeling that we were done. I think if I ever had that feeling, I would call it. For us and for the fans. But I've never had that instinct.

Alex Marshall recently announced that he has left the band. Can you say anything about how that went down? Are you adding anybody new, or are there any other changes coming?
It's always a really hard thing to talk about because fans feel like they are owed an explanation, or they are owed a response. It's difficult because you know that, yes, they have been there with you throughout the years and they want to know what happened. But at the same time, so much happens and goes on behind closed doors, and it turns political and legal. I don't feel like I've ever been able to come forward and say what's happened with any of the band exits.

There comes a point where people are in different places. Whether it's mentally, or whether it's somebody growing tired of the music or of touring. I've always said that the Cab need to do what's best for the music and the fans. If you want to be in the Cab, you have to want to be in the Cab. I don't want anyone in this band that doesn't want to be a part of it, that doesn't care about the fans. I'm not saying we've had anyone that's necessarily been like that. It's not right of me to say exactly what goes on without them having a say.

Joey [Thunder, bassist] and Dave [Briggs, drummer], they're a part of the Cab. I look at everyone that's on stage playing with us as part of the Cab. I've never been one to look down on people. Some people are like, "Oh, they hired people?" Well, no. They're definitely part of the Cab. They do just as much as I do. They work just as hard as I do. I give them just as much credit. And they played on the album. Ian [Crawford], our old guitarist, also played on the album. He's kind of always been a part of the Cab, but he tends to be more of a studio member. He played everything on Lock Me Up.

As long as we're on the subject of former members, Cash Colligan decided to celebrate “Cab Day” in his own special way, re-releasing one of his raps with a couple of new bars directed at you. Do you pay any attention to that?
I'm going to be honest. I'm so busy worrying about important things that I haven't even watched it. If I wasted my time watching stuff like that, it would be a sad, sad time of my life for me. You know what? Freedom of speech. If people want to spend their time doing stuff like that for, I don't know, for attention or views or whatever it is, I just wish everyone the best. I just want everyone to find happiness, and if that's what brings you happiness, then that's what brings you happiness. I just don't have time to play along or to be a part of that circus.

You mentioned finding happiness, and it seems like you find your happiness in your music. What is the rest of the year going to look like for the Cab? Are we going to be seeing you out on the road?
Yeah, of course! We've just got to put the finishing touches on the album, and then we'll be touring again. We really miss seeing everyone on the road. We really miss being onstage, and all the fans. So I'm excited. We're just going to wrap up the music and then probably be out in the next few months. And then probably be touring for a few years straight, that's usually how it goes. ALT

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fueled by ramen the cab alex deleon

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