Goths rejoice: Scientists develop material so dark you can’t even see it

July 14, 2014 by Matt Crane

Goths rejoice: Scientists develop material so dark you can’t even see it

A British company has produced a material so black it absorbs all but 0.035 percent of visual light, which is the new world record apparently. According to the Independent, the “super black” coating is made of carbon nanotubes and is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. To give that some perspective: The material is so dark that if someone wore a dress made out of it, their head and limbs “might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.”

Read more from the Independent:

“If it was used to make one of Chanel's little black dresses, the wearer's head and limbs might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.

Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material's maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.

The nanotube material, named Vantablack, has been grown on sheets of aluminum foil by the Newhaven-based company. While the sheets may be crumpled into miniature hills and valleys, this landscape disappears on areas covered by it.”

This could be used to make some pretty trippy clothing for our favorite Goth musicians. The material will be launched at the Farnborough International Airshow this week. Check out a photo of Vantablack below, and let us know what you think.

Photo via the Independent

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