Nirvana

#204.1 – February 2010

AP TURNS 20
It's been two decades since Mike Shea got spray adhesive all over his mom's kitchen table laying out the first issue of AP. Since then, we've continued to, um, “stick” around to experience a lot of memories and music. Pour yourself a cold beverage and gather your older siblings who abandoned music to go work in a skyscraper, because we've got testimonials, memories and pictures of RANCID, AFI, NINE INCH NAILS, NIRVANA, SMASHING PUMPKINS, MARILYN MANSON, TAKING BACK SUNDAY and many, many others. Because it doesn't matter if you're old school or new school-at least you got educated in the first place.

THE ORAL HISTORY OF THE GET UP KIDS
The Get Up Kids have given all of themselves to jumpstart an underground scene that's just now prominent on the nation's radar. Trevor Kelley talks to Lawrence, Kansas' finest, along with some of their confidantes, associates and fans prior to the band's summer farewell tour.

“CAREER” IS NOT A FOUR-LETTER WORD: AP'S DIY ROUNDTABLE
As AP celebrates 20 years of doing it ourselves, we sit down with an all-star panel of folks who've rocked our world, booked our favorite gigs, and generally helped change our listening (and surfing) habits, to find out how they got this far on their own terms.

Features

AN ANGLE
Chris Anaya insists he’s a self-made man, and we think it’s cool that he’s willing to take the blame.

ISIS
Like compact discs, this progressive-metal outfit’s existence is similarly rated DDD: dirges, distortion and… dog poop?

AS I LAY DYING
A strong work ethic and an even stronger belief system make this blistering metal outfit thrive.SECTIONS

Incoming

OPINION
The AP Poll checks your I.D. at the door to see if you’re too old to rock, while Denver Dalley of Statistics breaks down DIY, Omaha-style, in this month’s AP Op-Ed.

NEW RELEASES/IN THE STUDIO
We preview upcoming discs from the All American Rejects, No Use For A Name and more in New Releases/Advance Listens, and In The Studio spies on Coheed And Cambria, H.I.M. and Thrice.

WIRETAPPING
The Briefing whispers into your ear; Equal Vision tells its own story in Label Profile; Disclothesure is a cut-up, literally; Thrice drummer Riley Breckenridge checks in from 36,000 feet in his monthly advice column; Gang Of Four face their clones; haggis is for poseurs; Yellowcard frontman Ryan Key gets a Cold Call; Meshuggah, Lucero and Death By Stereo let us peek into their gig bags; Acceptance, Bloodlined Calligraphy and Still Remains rule Low Profiles; we check in with CKY, Bleed The Dream and the Eyeliners-and, really, that’s just the first few pages.

SCREENING
Elizabeth Banks reaches new heights in, well, Heights; Amber Tamblyn puts a sock in Joan Osborne in The Sisterhood Of The Traveling Pants; Miranda July talks about Me, And You And Everyone We Know; Eye Candy rekindles a love affair with Moog; and Now Showing practices its cinematic reflexes to better prepare for cage fighting in theaters and DVD players this season.

REVIEWS
If you haven’t visited The AP Record Store yet this month, you’re missing out on key reviews of Motion City Soundtrack, Alkaline Trio, Meshuggah, Oasis, Unsane, Gorillaz and more; In-Store Sessions with Stephen Malkmus and Neil Hamburger; all you need to know about classic acts like Blue Öyster Cult and Government Issue in I Don’t Know Ask That Guy and No, Seriously, Ask That Guy; and righteous reissues and rarities in Collector’s Corner; plus, check out what our staff rocks out to when no one else is looking in Listening Station.

10 Essential PUNK-ROCK CONCERT ALBUMS
When you can’t get into the show, you bring the show to you-at least where these 10 classic live albums are concerned.