cradle of filth dani filth
[photo via Cradle of Filth Facebook]

Dani Filth of Cradle of Filth has opened up about the connection between black metal music and church burnings.

In an interview with Louder’s Metal Hammer, Filth discussed how the whole genre shouldn’t be associated with church burnings.

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“What I like about that time is the passion about it, I thought it was quite exciting,” Filth said of the Norwegian black metal scene in the ‘90s. “I have been friends with every single person from that scene since, and I can’t remember anyone that’s said ‘Yeah that was really great.’ Everyone said ‘We were idiots, we were kids.”

“I’m so happy that I didn’t get caught up in that whole thing because I could have done, but imagine waking up thinking ‘Oh god, I’ve just burned down a church, I’m going to prison for 25 years, I’m an idiot.’”

Speaking of the burnings, last month, a man suspected to have set fire to three historically black Louisiana churches may have been influenced by “black metal” music to commit the crime.

 

This is not the first incident in recent weeks surrounding church fires and metal music. According to the New Zealand Herald, a 28-year-old metal drummer set fire to two Mormon churches in March. The man, Jacob Lowenstein, was charged for the crime.  

Other news

Bring Me The Horizon’s keyboardist has opened up in a new interview about the band, Oli Sykes’ vocal health and their current single “Wonderful Life.”

One of the most interesting parts of the interview was about the band’s current single “Wonderful Life” featuring Dani Filth of Cradle of Filth.

“That song, it’s just a weird song,” he said.  “It’s not really the most cleanly executed in terms of the arrangement. It just happened to work that way. In the end, I’ve kind of told myself that it goes with the lyrics, because they’re all a bit random.”

“The whole song sounds a bit random with the weird sounds, and it’s got Dani Filth on it, so I guess that one just happens to work in some way,” he continued.

He said the band didn’t really intend to have Filth on the song, as it was already put together with only Sykes’ vocals. However, Sykes suggested it and it ended up working.

“Oli just messaged him on Instagram — just literally (direct messaged) him,” he said on how it came about. “I think he thought it was a wind-up at first, because he messaged back and said, ‘If this is really you, then yes, I’m up for it.’ He’s a nice guy.”

If you haven’t heard the song, you can listen below.

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