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[Photo via Unsplash/Saulo Mohana]

Yesterday, Instagram began warning users their caption content might be considered “potentially offensive.” The warnings are generated via the platform’s AI technology which interprets the postings to be offensive or hurtful in any way.

The program is being instituted by Instagram in an effort to eliminate acts of bullying. If users post content the technology interprets as malicious or offensive, a notification will be generated that the content “looks similar to others that have been reported.” Users will then be encouraged to edit their captions accordingly, but will also give them leeway to post their intended commentary.

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On the Instagram press site, the company says that the results have been “promising” in its end goal. The intention is like having an AI bestie who would look at your phone and think, “I don’t know, man. You sure you want to say that?”

But as sure as the sun will shine tomorrow, haters are gonna hate and some people will post trash regardless. Instagram is looking to make their realm a more civilized place through personal user responsibility as opposed to any stringent mandatory guidelines.

The company says that the program is being rolled out in “select countries” currently, but will become a global feature sometime in 2020. This year, Instagram has been ramping up their commitment to making their platform “user kinder.” In mid-summer, they launched the “Restrict” feature to aid in shadow-banning obnoxious and malicious users from other people’s feeds. In September, a function originally offered to filter words from the feeds of high-profile users was made available to all of the platform’s users. The company has also made significant strides in developing new filters to aid in the blocking of spam accounts and posts.

More on Instagram

The end of the year means everyone from YouTube to Spotify are sharing their year-end recaps. While not officially sanctioned by the app itself, Instagram users can also find out their year-end stats featuring their top nine photos through a simple website.

Each year, Top Nine compiles users’ most-liked photos, and the 2019 version is finally here. While Instagram started testing public like count removal in the U.S. last month, that doesn’t hinder the opportunity to see what your followers liked best. See how to get your Top Nine below.

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Once launched from their website, Top Nine will prompt you to enter your username. After entering your username, it will ask you to input your email. “Some accounts may take more than a couple of seconds to analyze. We will email your Top Nine so you don’t have to wait! We will also use this email to send you updates about Top Nine in the future.”

However, if you just want to enter your email to get you Top Nine and unsubscribe, the app shares you can do so at http://topnine.co/forget-me.

Once your Instagram username and email are entered, you will be taken to the final page. “Whoa! Top Nine is currently being used by millions of users worldwide,” the page reads. “Don’t worry! We will email your Top Nine.”

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Once emailed, you can download your perfectly square recap directly from the email to share wherever you please. In addition to most-liked photos, it shows how many posts, total likes and likes per post you averaged in 2019.

Top Nine launched three years ago with 2,000,000 users downloading the iPhone app last year. So far this year, 6,453,639 users have gotten their personal Top Nine, according to their site.

Top Nine is available directly through their website at topnine.co. You can also download their app in the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

This year, the app will also turn your most-liked images into an interactive video. There are four unique options, which you can check out here.

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