[Photo via Wikipedia Commons]

People holding their phones up at concerts can be pretty annoying, but it’s even worse when they’re flashing their light at the same time.

Judas Priest vocalist Rob Halford made it clear to one fan at a recent show that he is not down with that behaviour.

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At a recent show in Chicago, Halford can be seen very casually walking up to a fan flashing his light in the vocalist’s face and hoofing their phone from their hands.

Immediately after kicking the phone away, Halford goes on to perform as if nothing happened. Check out the video below a little over thirty seconds in to see the seamless kick.

Halford’s kicking skills are completely justified in this instance, but this kind of behaviour has been frowned upon in the past.

A few years ago, Queens Of The Stone Age frontman Josh Homme came under fire for his own kicking incident which was completely uncalled for.

Homme kicked a female photographer in the face during one of the band’s performances despite there being no reason to.

The photographer, Chelsea Lauren, explained at the time she “never actually photographed Queens Of The Stone Age before, I was really looking forward to it.”

“The next thing I know his foot connects with my camera and my camera connects with my face, really hard. He looked straight at me, swung his leg back pretty hard and full-blown kicked me in the face. He continued performing, I was startled, I kind of stopped looking at him, I just got down and was holding my face because it hurt so badly.”

Lauren was encouraged by numerous people to press charges but eventually the incident was dropped, though he faced repercussions. Homme also eventually posted an apology video.

“I feel like if I don’t do anything, he gets to kick people in the face and not get in trouble because he’s a musician,” Lauren explained. “That’s not right.”

What do you think of Rob Halford kicking the fan’s phone away? Let us know in the comments below.

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