Matty Healy of the 1975
[Screenshot via YouTube]

The 1975 frontman Matty Healy offers an apology and clarification today over an opinion he aired about music’s entanglement with misogyny. The remark from the musician was published last week in an interview with The Fader.

Calling the observation patronizing, “uninformed and reductive,” the 1975 singer takes to Twitter to develop his thoughts, contending that, while the excerpt is “not all a misquote,” he may have been “simplifying a complex issue.”

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In the comment in question, Healy argued that misogyny “doesn’t happen in rock and roll anymore.” And he put forth that hip-hop’s relationship with women “hasn’t caught up to its relationship with itself.” Read the original quote here:

“The reason misogyny doesn’t happen in rock and roll anymore is because it’s a vocabulary that existed for so long is that it got weeded out. It still exists in hip-hop because [the genre] is so young, but it’ll stop. That’s why you have this moment with young black men — Kanye-aged men, as well — talking about their relationship with themselves, which is a big step forward for hip-hop. Drake, for example. But then they’ll be like, “But I still got bitches.” The scene’s relationship with women hasn’t caught up to its relationship with itself, but that’s something that will happen.”

Now, in a multi-thread Twitter message, the musician counters that his criticism was incorrect. “I’m sorry for saying that as I was wrong,” Healy notes. Check out the complete statement, and see the entire Twitter thread, directly below:

“This bit of me talking in an interview reads as patronising, uninformed and reductive,” writes the 1975 figurehead. “And to be fair it is. And I’d like to apologise. What I said isn’t correct. And it’s not all a misquote. Just for clarity I said that misogyny wasn’t ALLOWED in rock and roll now days in a way it is in hip hop – not that it doesn’t exist, that’s maybe a misquote as I’m aware of the misogyny in rocknroll…” He continues:

“I would never deny the RAMPANT misogyny that exists in Rock n Roll. It’s everywhere and has been a weirdly accepted part of it since it’s inception. BUT now looking at what I said – I was simplifying a complex issue without the right amount of education on the subject. think cos I’m so actively trying to support women(not a brag but with the record label etc)I kinda forget that im not very educated on feminism and misogyny and I cant just ‘figure stuff out’ in public and end up trivialising the complexities of such enormous, experienced issues. So basically, I’m sorry for saying that as I was wrong. And thanks for pointing it out cos if I’m gonna do this I have to keep learning.”

However, Healy maintains that one aspect of the interview quote was indeed something he did not utter. Concerning the position that rock music no longer harbors any misogyny, the musician argues that he never made such a claim:

The 1975’s A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships—which features the singles “It’s Not Living (If It’s Not With You),” “Sincerity Is Scary,” “TOOTIMETOOTIMETOOTIME,” “Love It If We Made It” and “Give Yourself A Try”—came out last month.

What do you think about Healy’s apology? Were you taken aback by the 1975 frontman’s opinions in the original Fader article? Sound off in the comments section and let us know what you think about Matty Healy’s new statement.

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