george floyd black lives matter spotify playlist
[Photo by: Lorie Shaull/Wikimedia Commons]

Like many individuals and companies within the music industry, Spotify took part in Blackout Tuesday this week. The day was created to promote reflection and support for the Black Lives Matter movement. For Spotify, the company decided to use its platform as a way to show its support for the movement.

Along with blacking out playlists and pages, the streaming service uploaded a tribute playlist to honor George Floyd. While only one track was added to it, Spotify’s choice has shown they stand in solidarity.

Read more: Here’s why the show must be paused to stand with the black community

Protests worldwide broke out after Floyd was killed at the hands of Minneapolis police. Since then, hundreds of thousands of protestors have taken to the streets worldwide in support of Black Lives Matter.

Musicians have also been showing their support for the protests and the need for change in America. Halsey, YUNGBLUD, Mod Sun, Machine Gun Kelly, The Driver Era‘s Ross Lynch, FEVER 333‘s Jason Aalon Butler and so many more took part in protests this week.

Many artists have also been vocalizing their support online. Others including Set It Off, nothing,nowhere. and Emo Nite held livestreams over the weekend and raised thousands of dollars for organizations that support the movement.

Now, Spotify is showing its support. Not only has the streaming service blacked-out images and logos on its platform, but the company is also including a silent George Floyd tribute track on various playlists.

Read more: People are calling for a Dolls Kill boycott over the owner’s protest comment

The silent track runs 8 minutes and 46 seconds long. This is the length of time Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin held his knee down on Floyd’s neck causing his death. According to an autopsy report, Floyd died as a result of “asphyxiation from sustained pressure” from Chauvin even as Floyd pleaded “I can’t breathe.”

Spotify also took to Twitter to share its support for Black Lives Matter and Blackout Tuesday.

“We stand with the Black community. Our employees, our partners, artists and creators – in the fight against racism, injustice and inequity,” the tweet reads. “Now is not the time for silence. We will continue to use the power of our platform to amplify Black voices so they are heard.”

Along with the tribute playlist, Spotify is amplifying Black voices by further showcasing its Black History Is Now hub. The hub is a central resource and home for music, playlists and podcasts such as Code SwitchYou Had Me At Black, and Higher Learning With Van Lathan And Rachel Lindsay. It also features several playlists including Black History Salute, We Shall Overcome and Black Lives Matter playlist.

Read more: Cole Sprouse is using his arrest to further Black Lives Matter conversations

In an announcement this week, Spotify shares what it is doing to support Black Lives Matter and the Black community.

“June 2nd is Black Out Tuesday, a day of collective disconnect from work meant to help people reflect and come together in support of the Black community,” the statement reads. “On this day—and every day—Spotify will support our employees, friends, partners, artists and creators in the fight against racism, injustice, and inequity. We are using the power of our platform to stand with Black creators, amplify their voices, and accelerate meaningful conversation and long-needed change.”

Spotify’s George Floyd tribute playlist and the Black Lives Matter playlist are available to stream below.

For ways to donate, please head here. For anti-racism resources, head here. A detailed list of resources and links is below.

To sign petitions for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and more. 

To donate to victims, protesters, black-owned businesses and more. 

For anti-racism sites, Black Lives Matter, Mental Health and other educational resources.

A massive resource link containing information for protesters regarding laws, lawyers, dangers of protesting, medical guides on dealing with tear gas, first aid and digital security.