Aladdin
[Photo via Disney]

Despite some mass confusion following Genie’s first reveal in the live-action Aladdin, Disney fans are slowly growing fond of Will Smith‘s adaptation of our big, blue, friend. Now, Smith has taken to Instagram to share a tribute to the original Genie, played by the late Robin Williams.

You may want to grab the tissues for this one.

Read more: MGK explains how he perfected Tommy Lee’s iconic drum stick twirl


Earlier today, the latest of the Disney live-action remakes dropped its first official trailer featuring magic carpet rides, magical lamps and a whole lot of Will Smith as the blue Genie.

Previously, the film has released teasers that have caused some mixed reactions. This was mostly due to the first look at Smith in true Genie form.

Following the release of an Entertainment Weekly cover of the main characters in December, fans were disappointed to see Genie without his familiar blue skin tone.

Smith responded with an Instagram post assuring his followers that he would be blue in the film and that the promo photo was just Genie in his human disguise.

If you haven’t already, or simply want to watch it again, you can check out the trailer below!

While there are still a few mixed reactions to Will Smith’s Genie, one thing all fans can agree on is that his tribute to the original Genie (Robin Williams) will tug at your heartstrings.

Smith took to Instagram to post a photo of Williams’ Genie alongside an animated version of his Genie character.

“I know Genies don’t have Feet… But you left some Big Shoes to fill. 😊 R.I.P., Robin!”

We’re not crying, you’re crying!

Other Disney remakes currently underway include The Lion King and Dumbo films that are approaching in the coming months. There have also been rumors of a possible live-action remake of The Nightmare Before Christmas that could already be in the works.

Aladdin hits theaters May 24.

What do you think of Will Smith’s tribute to Robin Williams? Sound off in the comments below!

See more: 10 surprising artists you won’t believe appeared on AP’s cover