Panic! At The Disco

#238 – May 2010

IN THE RAG

PANIC AT THE DISCO
The most polarizing post-emo band in Las Vegas (heck, maybe the whole country) have returned with an ambitious new album and a “play, don’t worry” attitude. Will their fans abandon them? Will their critics carve them up? Will faceless message-board haters continue to cackle? Most importantly, however: Do the band even care about any of this?

SPECIALS
AP PRESENTS: THE INNOVATORS
In this special photo feature, we celebrate the accomplishments of people who forged their own paths to make things happen behind the bands in today’s contemporary punk scene. From tour promoters to merch mavericks, savvy managers to no-B.S. booking agents, these are the folks who get things done.

NO FENCES, NO BORDERS: INSIDE MEXICO CITY PUNK
Sure, Warped Tour is cool and the Bamboozle is sweet. But some of the best contemporary punk happening right now is coming from Mexico City. AP correspondent Chema Solari offers us a brief overview of the Mexico City punk scene, from important discs to cultural touchstones. In addition, we catch up with three crucial Mexipunk acts ALLISON, PXNDX and DIVISION MINISCÚLA so by the time you’re finished reading this, you’ll be making new vacation plans for over the border.

SECTIONS
INCOMING: LOVE LETTERS, HATE MAIL & SOUND ADVICE

OPINION
Armor For Sleep frontman Ben Jorgensen encourages everyone to be themselves without putting others down in Op-Ed; and everyone from the Devil Wears Prada to Poison The Well (and you, of course) tell us if celebrities’ personal lives affect our appreciation of their art in the AP Poll.

NEW RELEASES
We preview albums from the Breeders, Greeley Estates and more; and In The Studio checks up on Alkaline Trio, the All-American Rejects and Anberlin.

WIRETAPPING
There’s no official textbook on becoming a rock star, but our AP: DIY section is recognized in 49 states as a suitable cheat sheet (we’ll convince you yet, Iowa!). This month we’ve got tips, tricks and traps to avoid from members of Bad Relgion, Big D And The Kids Table, Saosin and the Lawrence Arms, along with the techs and other experts who keep ’em running smoothly. Chalkboard Confessional talks inspiration with Dan Marsala of Story Of The Year; and Polyvinyl Records gets the Label Profile treatment.

AP RECOMMENDS
If you’re not already listening to Tokyo Police Club, Your Vegas and Polar Bear Club, we won’t tell. But, while no one’s looking, you better load ’em up on your iPod, stat!

AP STYLE
Allow us to introduce you to some of the hottest gear burning up our closets. This month, get to know Killbrand and a heap of hip kicks. Plus, we realize that looking good isn’t just about your duds; it’s also about your ’do… And your makeup… And your nails… You get the picture.

SCREENING
Please turn off all cell phones. Keep talking to a minimum, as not to disturb your fellow readers. Also, be sure to throw away all garbage in the receptacles provided. Now, sit back and enjoy our feature presentation, which includes some quality face time with Jim Sturgess, AnnaSophia Robb and the rest of what’s new and hot in theaters and DVD players this month.

REVIEWS
The AP Record Store is completely aware of allergy season approaching, and that’s why this month, we’re including a free tube of nasal spray with every review you read,* including those for new albums from From First To Last, No Use For A Name, In Flames, the Hush Sound, the Plastic Constellations, Big D And The Kids Table, Man Man, Omar Rodriguez-Lopez, Children Of Bodom, Thrice and more; our In-Store Sessions with Anti-Flag, Atmosphere, Phantom Planet, the Sword and Glorytellers can substitute for horseradish to open up your nostrils; our classic-rock and classic-punk columns on Santana and the Effigies are perfect for lowering pollen count; and Playlist, Collector’s Corner, Readers Chart and Listening Station are like an aural dehumidifier-or something. *just kidding

10 ESSENTIAL ALTERNATE-UNIVERSE HIT SINGLES
There’s overlooked songs, and then there’s songs that should be destined for the annals of pop-culture history, but due to any number of circumstances never got their fair shake. Scott Heisel delivers a list of tunes that, if he were God, would each have been No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100-or at least worthy of being your MySpace profile song.