Bring Me The Horizon bmth 2018 Alternative Press
[Photo by: Paul Harries]

Bring Me The Horizon’s keyboardist has opened up in a new interview about the band, Oli Sykes’ vocal health and their current single “Wonderful Life.”

Jordan Fish spoke with Cutter of “Cutter’s RockCast” in Milkaukee about various topics involving the band’s music.

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One of the most interesting parts of the interview was about the band’s current single “Wonderful Life” featuring Dani Filth of Cradle of Filth.

“That song, it’s just a weird song,” he said.  “It’s not really the most cleanly executed in terms of the arrangement. It just happened to work that way. In the end, I’ve kind of told myself that it goes with the lyrics, because they’re all a bit random.”

“The whole song sounds a bit random with the weird sounds, and it’s got Dani Filth on it, so I guess that one just happens to work in some way,” he continued.

He said the band didn’t really intend to have Filth on the song, as it was already put together with only Sykes’ vocals. However, Sykes suggested it and it ended up working.

“Oli just messaged him on Instagram — just literally (direct messaged) him,” he said on how it came about. “I think he thought it was a wind-up at first, because he messaged back and said, ‘If this is really you, then yes, I’m up for it.’ He’s a nice guy.”

If you haven’t heard the song, you can listen below.

 Fish also discussed the process of making amo in a general sense.

We just try a bunch of stuff and see what (works). To some extent, it’s pre-planned, because usually we have an idea of what kind of thing we want to go for on each song,” he said.  “With certain songs, it will be like, ‘This is the vibe,’ and that kind of guides what type of sounds you want to use and how we use the instruments therein.”

“In terms of my sounds, I can obviously do whatever. I don’t really have an instrument as such — electronics/programming, it just means anything, really,” he continued. “That’s part of the reason why we’re quite varied sonically, because I can put a harp in, or shit I can’t actually play — I can program (it).”

“Then in terms of the guitars, part of the challenge and what makes it interesting is trying to figure out ways to use them in different ways for different songs. To some extent, it’s just having a go and seeing what works and what sounds cool, and to some extent, it’s preordained, because we generally have an idea of what we’re going for with each song.”

You can see Fish’s entire interview below.

 More Bring Me The Horizon news

On Friday, BMTH were set to play in Toronto, but had to reschedule due to “venue logistical issues.” However, the band say that the incident was out of their hands. Additionally, according to the band, Live Nation is currently doing everything they can to work toward a proper resolution in the future.  

“We are sorry to announce that due to unforeseen venue logistical issues beyond our control the show tomorrow night in Toronto will be rescheduled until further notice,” the band say in a tweet. “All tickets sold for the May 17th show will be refunded at point of purchase.

“A new rescheduled show date will be announced soon. Live Nation has done their best to work out a scenario to adequately support the event to the standard expected, but unfortunately, that is not possible at this time.”

In other BMTH news, the band recently sent fans into a frenzy after posting some teasers over the weekend, sparking rumors that two new songs could be looming on the horizon.

The teasers were released for what fans believe to be two new tracks titled “happysad” and “you’re my only destiny.” You can check out the teasers here.

Additionally, frontman Oli Sykes has found an interesting way to determine the setlist for the band’s All Points East show — by asking the fans themselves. In fact, Sykes took to Twitter to ask fans what they wanted to hear them play at the show.

What do you think of the Bring Me The Horizon news? Sound off in the comments below!

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